Award Categories

bullet_pointJohn T. Curtis Award for Career Excellence in Ecological Restoration
bullet_pointVirginia M. Kline Award for Excellence in Community-Based Restoration
bullet_pointHenry C. Greene Award for Innovative Approaches in Restoration
bullet_pointJohn Nolen Award for Excellence in Ecological Restoration Practice

 

The John T. Curtis Award for Career Excellence in Ecological Restoration

John T. Curtis (1913-1961) was a University of Wisconsin-Madison ecologist. His seminal 1959 publication, The Vegetation of Wisconsin, provided the basis for ecological management at the UW-Madison Arboretum and elsewhere. This book, still in print, remains an invaluable reference for ecological restoration. An excellent teacher, he inspired students with his broad knowledge and enthusiasm for details. He worked tirelessly to increase knowledge of Wisconsin's plant life and conserve our natural heritage. Curtis contributed to the Arboretum in administrative, scientific and educational arenas. Curtis Prairie, the world's first restored prairie, was named in tribute to this inspiring ecologist.

Purpose

The John T. Curtis award recognizes individuals who have demonstrated career excellence to ecological restoration. Past award recipients made major contributions to Wisconsin ecological restoration and had a significant impact on the theory, practice, public awareness or effects of ecological restoration.

Award

The award is a cash prize of $2,000 along with an engraved plaque. Both will be presented to the winner at the Leopold Restoration Awards Dinner on October 8, 2015 held at the Arboretum Visitor Center in Madison. The recipient must be present to receive the award.

 

The Virginia M. Kline Award for Excellence in Community-Based Restoration

In 1976, shortly after receiving her PhD in botany (plant ecology) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Dr. Virginia M. Kline (1926-2003) was hired as the University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum ecologist. During her 21-year tenure as the Arboretum's ecologist, Kline inspired and encouraged people from all walks of life to become actively engaged in a wide range of environmental activities, including ecological restoration. Her warm personality and keen ecological insights helped her establish personal and professional relationships that embody the ideals of community-based ecological restoration. Kline helped many understand that we can accomplish more to protect and restore the land by working together. She was an inspirational teacher and scientist who made significant contributions by bringing together the natural and human communities.

Purpose

The purpose of the Virginia M. Kline award is to recognize a public or private organization that has dedicated time, skill, and efforts toward community-based ecological restoration. Involving people fulfills Virginia M. Kline and Aldo Leopold's aims -- that humans take their rightful place as full members of the land community. Community-based restoration brings the human community together and creates a more satisfactory relationship between humans and the larger biotic community.

Award

The award is a cash prize of $2,000 along with an engraved plaque. Both items will be presented to the winner at the Leopold Restoration Awards dinner on October 8, 2015 held at the Arboretum Visitor Center in Madison. The recipient must be present to receive the award.

 

The Henry C. Greene Award for Innovative Approaches in Restoration

Henry C. Greene (1905-1967) was a University of Wisconsin-Madison plant taxonomist and mycologist from the 1930's through the 60's. He almost single-handedly restored what is now known as Greene Prairie, a 50-acre portion of the UW-Madison Arboretum's Grady Tract. Greene planned the project and personally planted most of the plants in this area between 1945 and 1950. His work typifies the dedication and hard work needed to restore plant communities.

Purpose

The Henry C. Greene award recognizes an individual who has either created a widely-adopted approach or demonstrated an innovation that has proven useful in ecological restoration. The successful candidate will have designed creative or innovative approaches that restore species and terrestrial or aquatic systems.

Some examples of innovations in the field of ecological restoration include John Curtis's introduction of large-scale fire experiments for prairie restoration, the use of lime to change the pH of acidified lakes, Virginia Kline's fire regime experiments in the control of invasive biennial plants, and the use of computer technology to enable people to envision the future of a restored site. An innovation worthy of this award will have withstood the test of time and been utilized by others.

Award

The award is a cash prize of $2,000 along with an engraved plaque. Both items will be presented to the winner at the Leopold Restoration Awards dinner on October 8, 2015 held at the Arboretum Visitor Center in Madison. The recipient must be present to receive the award.

 

The John Nolen Award for Excellence in Ecological Restoration Practices

John Nolen (1869-1937) was a pioneer of professional city planning in the United States. His comprehensive approach merged social, economic, and physical aspects while emphasizing preservation of an area's natural beauty. Nolen's design for Wisconsin's capital city, Madison, is an important factor in the shape this city retains to this day.

In his 1911 report to the Madison Park and Pleasure Drive Association, Madison: A Model City -- considered to be a preeminent example of the urban landscape movement -- Nolen urged residents to preserve and restore the local natural features. He also urged the university to develop garden and horticulture resources, stating "The University of Wisconsin should have...a good-sized arboretum, say, 200 acres...," bringing him the designation of "father" of the Arboretum. When he died, The New York Times praised him as an "internationally known architect and pioneer in modern city and regional planning."

Purpose

The John Nolen award recognizes an individual, organization, group, or business that has demonstrated the sound practice of ecological principles in specific projects or applications. Past award recipients made major contributions to the practice and advancement of ecological restoration and provided exemplary applications of the theory, practice or public awareness of ecological restoration.

Award

The award is an engraved plaque of recognition, with an optional cash prize available (up to $2,000) at the discretion of the Friends of the Arboretum board of directors based on recommendations from the judges. The award will be presented to the winner at the Leopold Restoration Awards dinner on October 8, 2015 held at the Arboretum Visitor Center in Madison. The recipient must be present to receive the award.